Announcement

Collapse

General Forum Rules

This forum is open to all brands and aftermarket products.


No flaming or insulting other members, everyone is entitled to their own opinion.


Treat others how you want to be treated. If you do not have anything nice or productive to say, then don't say anything at all. Remember, you are interacting with real people and if you wouldn't say it to their face, then you probably shouldn't type it. Don't be a keyboard warrior!


No profanity. Dropping f-bombs doesn't make you cool.


Absolutely no obscene or pornographic content is allowed

Please post in the appropriate sections

Do not email, PM, call, or carrier pigeon etc. ADA Racing or admin with complaints about bans or Billetboard drama. If you were banned, it was for a reason and we're too busy to deal with those kind of complaints. If you have an issue with a moderator, please PM said moderator or any of the other moderators and if they have time to address it they will. Remember, we offer this board as a service to the community and it is a privilege to be on here, not a right.

Any member violating the above rules will be banned

These rules may be updated at any time
See more
See less

Huasheng/Kasei 63 Piston Port Build

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Huasheng/Kasei 63 Piston Port Build

    I recently bought a Huasheng/Kasei 63 engine form PNW GoPeds. It is a completely bone stock engine with the non-EPA compliant head. There has been so much talk about this engine on Facebook that I wanted to see what all the fuss was about.

    My current goal is to build a piston port HS63 that performs similarly to my piston port skopod 60 on the Wasp ped. So I'm hoping to be in the ~13k loaded RPM range with 8/72 gearing and a 200 pound rider. I think that it is possible given that the bore and stroke are pretty similar, but I do expect the HS63 to rev lower since the piston mass is much greater.

    I will first run the engine completely stock, in order to get a baseline for performance. Then, I will start doing some mods. I'll start with simple bolt-ons first, then I will move into porting.

    I did take apart the stock engine to check the insides. Unfortunately, Chinese engines have rather poor quality control, so it is generally a must that you take one of these import engines apart before running. These engines are cheap because those guys cut lots of corners, so it's important to determine what safety deficiencies are present from the get-go.

    After opening the engine up, it looked mostly ok. The chamfering is terrible though, and these engines also do not use needle bearing spacers under the piston. This latter note is really a bummer because I'm afraid that this thing will grenade itself at higher RPM because of all the conrod slop that you'll get without those spacers. This factor alone might kill my plan to make this a high revver, so it is possible that I change strategies down the line.

    Checking the intake manifold reveals that the bolt spacing for the stock carb is the same as that for an HDA 48 carburetor. Since I have a bunch of HDA 48 carburetors lying around, I will use that for my carburetor upgrade. I will need to bore out the intake manifold, but there is enough meat in the manifold for that to work without creating airleaks.

    Supposedly the timing on these things is very low, so I will be messing with that as well. It looks like there might be enough room to mount a GP460/RC coil onto an adjustable timing plate. I will be designing a plate and making it myself, but that will be further down the line.

    I also measured the stock port timings with the stock head gasket:

    Intake port: open @ 112 degrees ABDC, duration 134 degrees

    Transfers: Both open at the same time with the same duration, open @ 22-23 degrees after exhaust has opened, 104-110 degrees duration

    Exhaust: open @ 102 degrees ATDC, duration of 155 degrees

    From the port timings, it seems that there is alot of room to play with. Notably, all the timings are low, and relatively short for this size bore. Also, staggering the intake and exhaust transfer timing will probably help improve the scavenging efficiency, and ultimately the overall power curve.


    So my plan for now is to run the engine stock with 8/72 gearing in order to get a baseline. Rider weight will be measured for each run in order to keep runs as comparable as possible. Then I'll probably change carbs to the HDA 48, do some testing, then move onto switching out the pipe. That will be followed by porting, and probably ignition timing last.

    Anyways, here are some pictures:

    IMG_20200114_204047_579.jpgIMG_20200114_204047_578.jpgIMG_20200116_180217_010.jpgIMG_20200117_095603.jpgIMG_20200117_095558.jpgIMG_20200117_095454.jpgIMG_20200117_095550.jpgIMG_20200117_095545.jpg
    Attached Files
    Instagram: @base_cat

  • #2
    Amazing work

    Comment


    • #3
      Awsome ,will be following as i have a stage 4 from pnw with 460 conversion (fly wheel ,ignition,pullstart). Still working on getting mine dialed in.
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        I got ahead of myself and put some spacers to reduce the slop under the piston. Other than this though, the engine is stock. I will do a quick pass over the ports to smooth the chamfering. But after that, I will assemble it and run it with the stock timings and carb/exhaust setup. This will give me a sense for the bone stock performance since the chamfering and piston washers will not affect the power curve at all.

        For the spacers, I took some from an old G620PU. The stock 63 bearing is way too long for it all to fit under the piston, so I had to cut its length down to about 14mm. This was done by painstakingly sanding it down, with frequent measurements in between using my Mitutoyo calipers. I think that I did ok, since both sides are within 0.01 mm of each other, so the bearing should sit nearly perfectly center under the piston. There still is some slop, even with the washers, but it is noticeably better. Either way, I will still try to get as many RPMs as I can out of this thing. Hopefully my next post will be with some numbers on the stock performance.

        I have attached pics of the bearings as well.IMG_20200122_191536_850.jpgIMG_20200122_211524.jpg
        Instagram: @base_cat

        Comment


        • #5
          Awesome work once again Basement Cat. Your reviews are always a must follow. Will be keeping my eye on this thread.

          Comment


          • #6
            That is pretty cool, I have been thinking about putting a kasei or possibly a gp460 on my uberscoot/evo just not sure if the transmission will hold up. I'm sure you've seen this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjFo4rY_Gug

            Comment


            • #7
              Pretty cool BC, be sure to keep us updated!
              *******Pedding since '02********

              Comment


              • #8
                Oh yes, I'm totally in on this thread since I've been eyeing one of these 63cc engines to test out myself.
                2 Sports and a GSR40

                Comment


                • #9
                  did you have to cut the notches in the piston? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qynn2j2XELw <---- video of the kasei 63 cc opened up at 2:24 mark, Looks like he got the epa version. I have been reading the graham bell two stroke tuner guide, actually read it twice. I will use the stock 49cc engine as a guinea pig to test my porting skills if I decide to go with the 63cc. I just want to widen the ports for now, port timing is still voodoo magic to me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I saw this on ebay, adapter plate that allows you to bolt a gp460 coil to the kasei 63cc engine.
                    https://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Perfor...wAAOSwq15dr9cf

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X